Rick Beato

10 comments

Nov 01, 2019 • Posted by Sean Sheppard

Love what you are doing! I met George Benson in Hawaii when I was 11 years old. At that time I owned every LP and recording that I could find. Of course I was totally Star struck. All I could utter at first was, (your George Benson). He gave me a very warm smile and said hy little brother how you doing? I responded with. (I think I have every album you have, and I have been trying really hard to learn everything you do!) Of course at at 11 I had some kinks to work out. Having no inabitions at that age I launched into a litany of how did you do this riff how did you get that sound? The big thing that he did that was throwing me off was the harmony guitar sound he was getting. So he took about two hours of his time with his with his wife and kids patiently waiting to explain to this 11 year old tow head how to do double stops. He has been such an inspiration to me and my career as a musician. I think what you are doing is brilliant and inspirational! I have been a recording and performing artists for most of my life. I just want to say you are never to old to learn and be inspired. You have also been a great inspiration to me. Your talent (as a player as well as a teacher) is rare. Just wanted to let you know how much I respect what you are doing!

Nov 01, 2019 • Posted by David Cavazos Molina

God bless u tube and God bless Rick Beato

Nov 01, 2019 • Posted by Thomas

Amazing!

Nov 01, 2019 • Posted by David Pandone

Rick,

I’ve caught several of your videos over the past week or two and the virtuosity video and the Van Halen Effect made such a great observation of what had happened to change music. I really enjoyed your interview of Frank Gambale also… I’ve played guitar most of my life but never studied; so it’s a slow process.

Cheers, you do great work!

David

PS: My photo skills beg me to share the hint: add a “hairlight” from behind where your sitting which will separate your iconic black T-shirt from the deep shadows of the background.

Nov 01, 2019 • Posted by phil

I could binge watch your videos all day, Rick. I’ve been playing guitar for fifty years, it’s a lifelong learning experience, as I’m sure you know. Maybe someday we could have a couple of beers together.
dude, you are awesome,
sincerely,
Phil
PS maybe sometime I could send you some of my stuff. I compose and accompany myself. I call it ‘Phil plays with himself’.
Anyway, rock on dude.
I bought your Beato Book to support your efforts
Best wishes.

Nov 01, 2019 • Posted by Ronald Oberbeck

I think that what we just listened to was a long Litany of tortured Souls that feel compelled to express their torture through their genius.
As a guitar player the most important thing I’ve learned from you so far and players in general is employing air in my playing.
Music is a conveyance of emotions..
The lyric; a conveyor of imagery.
I’m still learning.
Thank you for your help.

Nov 01, 2019 • Posted by Bryan Hemedinger

Spot on comment about George Benson ! I so agree. I would rather hear that than shredding. Any info on the Dixe Dreggs?

Nov 01, 2019 • Posted by Brian B

Rick you are a GREAT window into what music was and is . Really enjoy your insight, as far as virtuosity I grew up in the time of Shredding (80s) and I HATED it. The session great players like Tommy Tedesco new how to say SO much with a seemingly simple little phrase that just would make the song. That’s the secret ingredient. Just a pinch at the right moment can really elevate a song. But I know you already know that.
Great stuff thanks for sharing !!

Nov 01, 2019 • Posted by Brian B

Rick you are a GREAT window into what music was and is . Really enjoy your insight, as far as virtuosity I grew up in the time of Shredding (80s) and I HATED it. The session great players like Tommy Tedesco new how to say SO much with a seemingly simple little phrase that just would make the song. That’s the secret ingredient. Just a pinch at the right moment can really elevate a song. But I know you already know that.
Great stuff thanks for sharing !!

Nov 01, 2019 • Posted by Sanad Rihani

Hey rick. My name is sanad. I’m sorry to bother you. I have a concern I believe you are more than capable of not only answering, but guiding me in the right path. I am a “self taught” piano player(internet of course)
I’m not half bad. I’ve been playing for 10 years and I’m confident I’ll obtain an enormous musical prowess before I pass.

But that is not what I’ve aimed to achieve musically. I’ve always looked at music as self expression. A way to find myself internally and express it. And also as a method of communication with other. When I envision this type of communication. I’d imagine myself being able to answer musical questions asked by other mysicaions( through their instruments ofcrouse). Essentially, if they lay down melody and harmony. I should be able to pick up on what’s happening and respond. Or perhaps a woman is singing an accapella and I would like to harmonize her melody and comp her. I know this involves an amazing phenomenon which I am not blessed with. I don’t have bad ears, I can pick up a melody after a few clicks on the keyboard and figure out what’s happening pretty quickly. But is there truly a way for me to unlock the ability to just instinctually play and not only in a solo setting, but a call and response type setting. I know relative pitch can go a long way. But how far can I truly train my ears. I watch videos of your son breaking down complex poly triad chords and all these altered upper structure chords. And I’m blown away. I would like to achieve a fairly similar ability although it may not be “perfect pitch”. Perhaps there is a method where I could hit two notes and find my way? I don’t knkw. But I am more than willing to put in the long hours as I have been.

Thank you for guiding us with your brilliance. I’ve watched just about every video you’ve made and I’ve become a better musician and human because of them. Once again, thank you. You inspire me to give my friends free music lessons and pass along the energy. I wish you and your family the best of lives.

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